Archive for the ‘rooster’ Tag

07/31/2022 Chicken Facts   Leave a comment

Living in Maine is always interesting. Maine is a large state with a very small population and most of the state is covered in forests with a population that consists of many rural folks. After moving here, I noticed that a great many people raise chickens. Every other yard has a chicken coop and a few birds roaming around the property. I always thought it was primarily the eggs everyone wanted but there are a couple of other reasons to have chickens I never considered. They are an easy way to remove bugs and ticks from your property and it’s also a very helpful way to help feed the many hawks, coyotes, and foxes that seem to be everywhere. They have to eat too you know. It’s not at all unusual for a homeowner to initially purchase six chickens and then be forced to replace a few every so often due to missing birds.

You would think these rural folks would be familiar with the many superstitions that surround chicken ownership. My better-half has tried numerous times to convince me to become a chicken owner but I’ve refused. I love eating them but after learning about all of these superstitions . . . no thank you. Here are a few things any potential chicken owner needs to know . . .

  • If a hen roosts at noonday that’s a sign that someone in the family will soon die.
  • Anyone who has the blood of the chickens spilled on their clothes will die an unnatural death.
  • The clucking of a hen near a patient’s head is a sign of death.
  • Watch out for mean gossip about you if you see two hens fighting.
  • If you see hens laying eggs, you will have good luck.
  • If you tie an old tough hen to a fig tree, the hen’s meat will become tender.

  • In Korea it’s unlucky if you hear a rooster crow at sunset and a hen cluck at night.
  • In Africa it’s unlucky for a rooster to crow before midnight.
  • In Germany it is believed that when a rooster crows when a guest is leaving – even if it’s at daybreak – that guest will soon die.
  • If a rooster crows in your cellar door – even at daybreak – it’s a sign of a speedy marriage.
  • If a rooster crows all day, expect rain.
  • If a rooster comes into your home, it’s a sign strangers will soon visit.

I hope that knowing all of these potential issues with chickens will help those of you who are on the fence about chicken ownership. I guess you could call this post a PSA, that’s Public Service Announcement for you chicken owners out there.

CLUCK. . .CLUCK. . .CLUCK

11/22/2021 Thanksgiving Myth?   Leave a comment

As I’ve repeatedly stated I am a huge fan of Thanksgiving. I am also a huge fan of debunking silly and unusual superstitions when I find them. I found one about Thanksgiving after reading a book in my collection. For most of my life I looked forward to Thanksgiving dinner and always made a point of collecting the wishbone. I was told as a kid by people who I trusted, Mom and Dad, that if I won the larger half of the wishbone after it was broken I would have good luck. I did it year after year and we made quite a thing of it but now I come to discover I was lied to. Here’s the truth of the matter . . .

Two people make a wish, and then grab the two long ends of the wishbone and pull. The one who breaks off the larger piece of the bone gets his or her wish. You must be sure the bone is dry – a day in the sun or on the stove dries it perfectly. The bone must be from the collarbone of a hen or a rooster. All of my family loved the routine of pulling the wishbone of the turkey after their meal. “Spoiler Alert”, turkey collarbones don’t work. I know this is devastating news to all of you but the truth will out. Here’s a short history lesson . . .

The Etruscans, those folks that came before the Romans, had a Hen Oracle. That person was often called upon to reveal hidden and magical knowledge. A hen or rooster was killed, the entrails examined – for what, no one can fathom – and the birds collarbone put in the sun to dry. The wishbone was then pulled apart as it is today. The Romans actually stole this custom from the Etruscans and it then spread throughout the Roman Empire and where did it end up, on this blog today.

THE TRUTH SHALL SET YOU FREE

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