Archive for the ‘Just Saying’ Category

🙂Daily Quote🙂   Leave a comment

 “If you cannot do great things,

do small things in a great way.”

Oliver Napoleon Hill (October 26, 1883 – November 8, 1970)

was an American self-help author. He is best known for his

book Think and Grow Rich (1937), which is among the 10

best-selling self-help books of all time.

01/22/2022 The Seven Wonders X 4   Leave a comment

The first mention of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World was in the 5th century BCE. They were some of the greatest human achievements at that time. The list was used over the centuries by many medieval writers but was mainly concerned with the accomplishments of the Greek or Roman empires. At that time very little was known of faraway cultures and their creations. Here is the traditional list of seven:

Giza Pyramids (Egypt), The Hanging Gardens of Babylon (Iraq), Temple of Artemis (Turkey), Statue of Zeus (Greece), the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus (Turkey), the Colossus of Rhodes (Greece), and the Pharos of Alexandria (Egypt).

While these seven were indeed a wonder, there were many other places elsewhere on the globe with achievements worthy of mention. Here are just a few to make my point:

The Great Wall (China), Angkor Wat (Cambodia), Machu Picchu (Peru), the Taj Mahal (India), the Moai Statues (Easter Island), the Aztec Temple of Tenochtitlan (Mexico), the Shwedagon Pagoda (Myanmar), and the Coliseum (Italy).

These were just a few. I could easily have named at least two dozen more. Let’s change categories now to name the Seven Wonders of the Industrial Age.

The Transcontinental Railroad (USA), the London Sewer System England), the Panama Canal (Panama), Hoover Dam (USA), the Three Gorges Dam (China), the Banaue Rice Terraces (Philippines), and the Bell Rock Lighthouse (Scotland).

What about the modern world and it’s wonders? Here are seven more to consider:

Itaipu Dam (Brazil), the Channel Tunnel (England/France), the Twin Towers (USA), the Zuider Zee Dam (Netherlands), the Petronas Towers (Indonesia), the CN Tower (Canada), and the Burj Khalifa (UAE).

I’ve offered up a lot of information here and many will likely disagree with some of my choices. The point of this historical rampage was to show that creativity and wonder aren’t limited to one country or one continent. The wonders of the world are too numerous to list, and every country has their own favorites. I find it amazing that as a species we have so many similarities and so little understanding of each other. Maybe someday it will improve.

WE CAN ONLY HOPE

💥Daily Quote💥   Leave a comment

Eldridge Cleaver

“The price of hating other human beings

is loving oneself less.”

Leroy Eldridge Cleaver (August 31, 1935 – May 1, 1998) was 

an American writer and political activist who became an early

leader of the Black Panther Party. 

01/17/2022 Women’s Words   Leave a comment

Elizabeth I

I thought it was time to recognize the fairer sex. As you well know I love posting quotations, but I’ve come to realize that most quotations are attributed to men. I know for a fact that women have important thoughts on every subject, but I almost never see them published anywhere. Today I’ll be sending you quotes made by women about men. It should be interesting . . .

  • “The more I see of men, the better I like dogs.” Marie-Jeanne Roland 1754-1793
  • “Men have had the advantage of us and telling their own story. Education has been theirs insomuch higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands.” Jane Austen 1775-1817
  • “A gentleman opposed to their enfranchisement once said to me, “Women have never produced anything of any value in the world.” I told him the chief product of the women had been the men and left it to him to decide whether the product was of any value.” Anna Howard Shaw 1847-1919
  • “Intense love is often akin to intense suffering.” Francis Ellen Watkins Harper 1825-1911
  • “Passion always goes, and boredom stays. Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel 1883-1971
  • “I do not consider divorce an evil by any means. It is just as much a refuge for women married to brutal men as Canada was to the slaves of brutal masters.” Susan B Anthony 1820-1906
  • “I do not want a husband who honours me as a queen, if he does not love me as a woman.” Elizabeth I 1533-1603

This will be the first installment of quotes by women. I have many more available and will pass them on periodically because some of them are truly profound. For my friend in Romania many thanks for prodding me to do the required research. I appreciate it.

“YOU ARE ICE AND FIRE”

01/16/2022 🚙Bumper Sticker🚙   Leave a comment

Not All Dumbs Are Blonde

01/16/2022 🎆Quote of the Day🎆   Leave a comment

Leonardo da Vinci was a true genius who graced this world with his presence from April 15, 1452, to May 2, 1519. He is among the most influential artists in history, having left a significant legacy not only in the realm of art but in science as well, each discipline informing his mastery of the other. 

“Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and

poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen.”

Leonardo da Vinci 1519

01/15/2022 The Human Body   2 comments

After my last two years of medical issues and treatments, I consider myself something of an expert on my own body. I thought I knew all I needed to know but once again I was mistaken. Here are a few really interesting tidbits that will blow your mind. Even you former and current medical professionals, you know who you are. Here we go . . .

  • On average there are approximately 75,000,000,000,000 (trillion) cells in the human body.
  • There are ten times as many bacteria cells living in your gut (750 trillion).
  • Sixty percent of the solids in your poo are made up of bacteria from your gut.
  • There are about 100 billion nerve cells in the adult human brain, but 10 times as many support cells to look after them.
  • Adults lose on average, about 100,000 nerve cells from their brain every day. Over the course of a lifetime this adds up to losing about 7% of the brain.
  • Your heart beats approximately 100,000 times a day without rest for an entire lifetime – that’s more than 2.5 billion beats in your life.
  • Laid end to end, a child’s blood vessels would stretch for over 60,000 miles: and adults for 100,000 miles – that’s four times around the Equator.
  • The blood of an adult male contains more than 25 trillion cells.
  • An average red blood cell lives for only 120 days. During this time, it will travel 300 miles on its journey round and round the body.
  • The average male produces 50,000 sperm per minute – that’s 72 million per day. A single male ejaculation contains 200 million sperm – theoretically enough to generate a combined population of Britain, France, and Germany.
  • Each sperm leaving the penis travels at 8000 body lengths per second, equivalent to a human swimming at 34,000 miles per hour.
  • Over the course of three years almost every cell in your body will have been replaced by new ones, making you literally a different person to who you were two years ago.
  • One square inch of human skin has 19 million cells, 60 hairs, 90 oil glands, 19 feet of blood vessels, and 625 sweat glands.
  • Fingernails grow twice to four times as fast as toenails and the nail on the middle finger grows the fastest.
  • If you lose a toenail, it will take approximately six months to grow back completely.

I actually love all of these bizarre facts that are available about the human body. I’m just as glad that I found out late in life about all this nonsense because it would have freaked me out a bit in my younger years. I’m just so happy that I get to share it with all of you and if you’re really lucky you might be able to win a few Trivia Night Contests at your local tavern. Have one for me while you’re there.

LOVE YOUR BODY & OTHERS IF NECESSARY

01/06/2022 Two True Stories   Leave a comment

Since this has been a slow week, I thought I’d post these two true stories. It makes for a longer than usual posting, but I think it’s worth the read. It was sent to me years ago by a close friend, but I never posted it due to its length. I hope you’ll take the time to read and enjoy this little-known tidbit of history.

STORY #1

Many years ago, Al Capone virtually owned Chicago. Capone wasn't famous for anything heroic. He was notorious for enmeshing the windy city in everything from bootlegged booze and prostitution to murder.

Capone had a lawyer nicknamed "Easy Eddie." He was Capone's lawyer for a good reason. Eddie was very good! In fact, Eddie's skill at legal maneuvering kept Big Al out of jail for a long time.

To show his appreciation, Capone paid him very well. Not only was the money big, but Eddie got special dividends, as well. For instance, he and his family occupied a fenced-in mansion with live-in help and all of the conveniences of the day. The estate was so large that it filled an entire Chicago City block.

Eddie lived the high life of the Chicago mob and gave little consideration to the atrocities that went on around him.

Eddie did have one soft spot, however. He had a son that he loved dearly. Eddie saw to it that his young son had clothes, cars, and a good education. Nothing was withheld. Price was no object. Despite his involvement with organized crime, Eddie even tried to teach him right from wrong. Eddie wanted his son to be a better man than he was.  Yet, with all his wealth and influence, there were two things he couldn't give his son; he couldn't pass on a good name or a good example.

One day, Easy Eddie reached a difficult decision. He wanted to rectify some of the wrongs he had done.
He decided he would go to the authorities and tell the truth about Al "Scarface" Capone, clean up his tarnished name, and offer his son some semblance of integrity. To do this, he would have to testify against The Mob, and he knew that the cost would be great. So, he testified.

Within the year, Easy Eddie's life ended in a blaze of gunfire on a lonely Chicago Street. But in his eyes, he had given his son the greatest gift he had to offer, at the greatest price he could ever pay. Police removed from his pockets a rosary, a crucifix, a religious medallion, and a poem clipped from a magazine.

The poem read:

"The clock of life is wound but once, and no man has the power to tell just when the hands will stop, at late or early hour. Now is the only time you own. Live, love, toil with a will. Place no faith in time. For the clock may soon be still."

STORY #TWO:

World War II produced many heroes. One such man was Lieutenant Commander Butch O'Hare.
He was a fighter pilot assigned to the aircraft carrier Lexington in the South Pacific. One day his entire squadron was sent on a mission. After he was airborne, he looked at his fuel gauge and realized that someone had forgotten to top off his fuel tank. He would not have enough fuel to complete his mission and get back to his ship.

His flight leader told him to return to the carrier. Reluctantly, he dropped out of formation and headed back to the fleet. As he was returning to the mother ship, he saw something that turned his blood cold; a squadron of Japanese aircraft was speeding its way toward the American fleet.

The American fighters were gone on a sortie, and the fleet was all but defenseless. He couldn't reach his squadron and bring them back in time to save the fleet. Nor could he warn the fleet of the approaching danger. There was only one thing to do. He must somehow divert them from the fleet. Laying aside all thoughts of personal safety, he dove into the formation of Japanese planes. Wing-mounted 50 caliber's blazed as he charged in, attacking one surprised enemy plane and then another. Butch wove in and out of the now broken formation and fired at as many planes as possible until all his ammunition was finally spent. Undaunted, he continued the assault. He dove at the planes, trying to clip a wing or tail in hopes of damaging as many enemy planes as possible, rendering them unfit to fly. Finally, the exasperated Japanese squadron took off in another direction. Deeply relieved, Butch O'Hare and his tattered fighter limped back to the carrier.

Upon arrival, he reported in and related the event surrounding his return. The film from the gun-camera mounted on his plane told the tale. It showed the extent of Butch's daring attempt to protect his fleet. He had, in fact, destroyed five enemy aircraft. This took place on February 20, 1942, and for that action Butch became the Navy's first Ace of W.W.II, and the first Naval Aviator to win the Medal of Honor.

A year later Butch was killed in aerial combat at the age of 29. His hometown would not allow the memory of this WW II hero to fade, and today, O'Hare Airport in Chicago is named in tribute to the courage of this great man. So, the next time you find yourself at O'Hare International, give some thought to visiting Butch's memorial displaying his statue and his Medal of Honor. It's located between Terminals 1 and 2.

SO, WHAT DO THESE TWO STORIES HAVE TO DO WITH EACH OTHER?


Butch O'Hare was "Easy Eddie's" son.

01/04/2022 Number Freaking   Leave a comment

As I’ve mentioned many times in the past, one of my favorite books to read is called Number Freaking. It is a mass of statistics relating to odd and unusual information which I find fascinating. Today’s posting concerns the worldwide population as seen from a different perspective. I find it interesting, and I hope you do as well.

For a sense of how fast the global population grows, according to the US Bureau of the Census, in one hour between 5:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. on May 2, 2005, the net growth in the global population was 8,470. Now, if we imagine the entire global population as a village of precisely 200 people, here are some things we would observe.

97 would be women (at birth), 103 would be men (at birth), 34 would be left-handed, 60 would be under 15 years of age, 14 would be over 65 years of age, 38 would come from the more developed countries, 162 would come from the less-developed countries, there would be 122 Asians (including 38 from China, 34 from India, and six from Indonesia), and there would be 24 Europeans.

There would be 28 Africans (including 22 who live in the sub-Sahara), 18 from South America and the Caribbean, 10 from North America (including nine Americans), one from Oceania, 120 would live within 62 miles of a coastline, 96 would-be urban dwellers, 50 would be homeless or live in substandard housing, 96 would lack access to basic sanitation, 32 would lack access to safe drinking water, and 28 would suffer from malnutrition.

32 would be unable to read or write, 58 would believe in witchcraft, nine would get drunk each day, and one would eat at McDonald’s each day. FYI, the global infant mortality rate is 55 per 1000 births.

I’m not entirely sure who the individuals are who spend their time researching and creating these statistics, but I’m glad they’re out there. There are times when the numbers of global anything are so large it’s hard to grasp them for most people. That’s true with all statistics in general but when you’re talking global it’s mind-bending. I find the statistics from this book much easier to understand when put into statistics that I can wrap my head around. I’m still reading the book but as I find more little tidbits, I’ll be sure to pass them along because they are interesting if not a little depressing.

HAPPY NEW YEAR

12/15/2021 Gesundheit ??   Leave a comment

I’ve never been a person plagued with any major allergies except for ragweed in the summer. Prior to puberty I was haunted by any number of allergies, but they went away at about age 14. Jump forward a few decades and all of a sudden, my allergies have returned with a bang. It appears that I’ve been around just long enough to go back through puberty in the opposite direction. That being said it’s a given that I’m sneezing a lot more than I’ve ever sneezed in my life. There are many reasons for sneezing and I’m not about to try and list them all. Let’s just agree, sneezing is sneezing, everybody does it, and that’s that. Since I come from a German background all I’ve ever heard when there was a sneeze going on was the German word gesundheit. It’s an automatic response meaning “good health”. I honestly never had any idea what it meant and only found out just recently.

I decided to check out a few other cultures to see if there was anything unusual about their responses to sneezing.

  • In many Muslim countries it translates out to “May Allah have mercy on you.”. Pretty cool but way too long.
  • In Serbia, they use the term pis maco, with children, which means “Go away, kitten”. Cute, I guess.
  • In Vietnam, cơm muối, is offered and means “rice with salt.” Thats a real puzzler.
  • Latin America’s is a little more interesting. The first sneeze earns a response of “health,” the second “money,” and the third “love.”  I like this one the best.
  • A common story holds that around the year 750, Pope Gregory believed that a sneeze was an early sign of the contraction of the bubonic plague. Saying “God bless you” was a sort of deathbed prayer: ‘May God see your worth and help you, because you’re definitely about to die.” Isn’t that just heartwarming?
  • And “God bless you” seems to be very popular response with many cultures but of course not for those pesky atheists. They’re a little touchy about the “GOD” word.

So much for my sneezing trivia. Now that I’ll be housebound for the next four winter months breathing all of this unhealthy stale air, I suppose I’ll be hearing “Gesundheit” way too many times for the foreseeable future.

9 MORE SHOPPING DAYS LEFT

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