Archive for the ‘writing’ Category

05/05/2022 More Bad Poetry   3 comments

Enjoy the holiday!!

Poetry is an enigma to me. I wouldn’t know good poetry if my life depended on it and even the bad poetry that I sometimes see doesn’t sound so bad. Anything that confuses me like that makes it impossible for me to take it too seriously. After a recent Bad Poetry Post, I received a few e-mails with samples from some of my readers. I assume they sent them because they thought they were bad, I don’t really know, so you figure it out. I think the first one was sent to me because I’m from Maine and someone thought I might be interested in Moose poetry. Good luck with that one. Here it is . . .

A moose is like a bull on stilts
With a silly kind of head.
And if one of them sat on you
You’d probably be dead.

Do you really think that’s bad poetry? It seems okay to me but nothing special. It’s a little bit of truth with a little bit of silliness. Here’s the next one which I really don’t understand about a Toad. It’s a little weird but kind of funny. It seems more like a limerick than poetry but when you get right down to it there isn’t much of a difference.

The story that is told
By a severely flattened toad,
Is of evidential failure
In attempts to cross the road.

This next poem hits home for me primarily due to my advanced age and secondly because it brings back memories of my favorite grandmother who passed away a very long time ago. See what you think.

💖

Of love and marriage who can say, which
way these things can go.
A loving wife, a shrieking hag, no one
will ever know.

The years of youth have come and gone,
with memories good and bad.
The happiness of family, the love of mom
and dad.

The years should teach you something, or
so we’re always told.
Remain yourself no matter what, and mellow
when your old.

Your life is filled with happiness, and
sorrows big and small,
But not until your old and gray, will you
understand it all.

It is a shame that through the years, this
knowledge lies unused.
Erring and blundering again and again,
with help and advice refused.

So, think about the elder ones, grandmothers,
grandfathers and such,
Who’ve experienced life’s many problems,
and could help you oh so much.

Their days are few in number, and once
their gone it’s sad.
Accept their help and listen close, to the
experiences that they’ve had.

And when they’ve gone, you’ll think of them
the way they used to be.
The memories are all you have, but that’s
enough you see.

🌯🍹🌶

ENJOY YOUR HOLIDAY

04/25/2022 More Bad Poetry   1 comment

Slow Dance

Have you ever watched kids on a merry-go-round?
Or listened to the rain slapping the ground?

Ever followed a bird’s erratic flight?
Or gazed at the sun as it fades into night?

Do you run through your day on the fly?
When you ask, “How are you?” Do you hear the reply?

When your day is done do you lie in your bed?
With the next hundred chores running through your head?

You’d better slow down don’t dance so fast.
Life is short and the music won’t last.

Ever told your child, we’ll do it tomorrow?
And in your haste, not see his sorrow?

Ever lost touch and let a good friendship die?
Cause you never had time to call and say “Hi”

When you’re running so fast to get somewhere,
You miss all of the fun in getting there.

When you rush and worry all through your day,
It’s like an unopened gift that’s just thrown away.

Life isn’t a race. Do take it slower,
Listen to the music before the song’s over.

MORE TO COME

04/24/2022 More Kids’ Limericks   Leave a comment

Most of you readers enjoy the limericks I post but even more seem to enjoy the limericks created by kids. Here are a few more selections for your amusement.

Violet McDonald – Age 11

Thr wnce ws a grl fr, SX

Who cdnt stp usin hr txt:

She ws gtin a bor,

I cud nt take no mor,

So I fd hr phn 2my dg Rx

😍😍😍

Celia McMaster – Age 12

A hungry old goat name Heather

Was tied up with an old piece of leather.

In a minute or two

She had chewed it right through,

And that was end of her tether!

🤪🤪🤪

David McDermott – Age 13

There is a young boxer named Walter,

Who comes from the island of Malta.

One day in the ring

He stepped on a spring,

And bounced all the way to Gibraltar.

😛😛😛

Brian Bell – Age 5

My brother’s name is Keith.

He hates to clean his teeth.

His dirty face

Is a real disgrace,

But he’s lovely underneath!

💩

04/23/2022 “Dune”   Leave a comment

I’ve always proclaimed my love for Sci-Fi. It’s been a consistent part of my life since I first watched my mother cover the walls of my bedroom with rocket ships and planets. Next came Sputnik and the space race began, and I was hooked. I read everything I could get my hands on that was sci-fi related and the first real book I devoured was Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. I found the book in a garbage can along the road as I was walking home from school one afternoon. My mind became instantly expanded in 1965 when the novel Dune was released. It was a complicated read for a young kid, but it was mind blowing as well. I read it two additional times with the book in one hand and a dictionary in the other. I wanted to understand it all.

In 1984 I was sent reeling when it was announced that a movie had been made. I loved the movie but as all movies do, they fall well short of the book. I saw that first movie a number of times over the years and still enjoy it to this day. That being said, I’ve read the entire five book series of Dune at least six times in the intervening years and it still blows my mind. Every time I reread it; I find things I missed before. As with J.R.R. Tolkien, J.K. Rowling, and Frank Herbert it staggers my imagination that they could sit down and write such epic works.

There was a TV series in 2000 but it gets no mention here. It sucked! I’ve recently began reading the original series again prompted by the release of the new movie. I’ve just finished The Children of Dune and I can’t wait to get started on the final two novels. I haven’t yet decided whether to see the new movie because I know in my heart it will disappoint me. Here are two quotes from the books I particularly liked. It’s this kind of writing that doesn’t translate well to a movie.

“The one-eyed view of our universe says you must not look far afield for problems. Such problems may never arrive. Instead, tend to the Wolf within your fences. The pacts ranging outside may not even exist.”

“Good government never depends upon laws, but upon the personal qualities of those who govern. The machinery of government is always subordinate to the will of those who administer that machinery. The most important element of government, therefore, is the method of choosing leaders.”

IF YOU GET A CHANCE, READ THE BOOK

04/19/2022 John Ciardi   Leave a comment

As someone who’s crazy for limericks of all kinds, I thought I’d introduce a new contributor to this blog. The name is John Ciardi, and he was a close friend of Isaac Azimov, my favorite limerick author. They partnered up back in the 70’s and wrote a book of their limericks. It was a limerick war between the two as part of their competitive friendship. I’ve blogged many of Azimov’s limericks and I think it’s only fair to give Mr. Ciardi equal time. Here are a few of his gems.

😂😂😂

There once was a girl who intended

To keep herself morally splendid

And ascend into Glory,

Which is not a bad story,

Except that that’s not how it ended.

😫😫😫

One semester a young prof named Innis

Taught two hundred coeds’ what sin is.

Not, bad, I acknowledge,

For a small country college,

But not worth recording in Guinness.

🤪🤪🤪

A businesslike lady once baited

The door of her flat with X-rated

Interior views,

And, in neon, FREE BOOZE.

Then stretched out on a bearskin and waited.

😎😎😎

A word spout named Howard Cosell

Set his sights on the language Nobel

By over inflating

His confabulating,

But to blow hard is not to blow well.

THANK YOU MR. CIARDI

04/10/2022 “Weekly Quote”   Leave a comment

To believe everything is to be an imbecile.

To deny everything is to be a fool.”

Charles Nodier 1844

He was born at Besançon in France, near the border with Switzerland. His father, on the outbreak of the French Revolution, was appointed mayor of Besançon and consequently chief police magistrate. Charles was an influential French author and librarian who introduced a younger generation of Romanticists to the conte fantastique, gothic literature, and vampire tales. His dream related writings influenced many later authors.

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