Archive for the ‘charlie chaplin’ Tag

01/18/2023 🎥Hollywood History🎥   Leave a comment

I thought I’d pander to my readership today since so many of you love information about celebrities and Hollywood and blah, blah, blah. I won’t be writing too much on the current list of celebrities that everyone seems to adore but will step back into the near past for some actual interesting trivia. I don’t care who they’re currently dating, I don’t care what they have to say about anything, and least of all who they might or might not be sleeping with. I find historical trivia when it comes to the Entertainment industry much more interesting. Here we go . . .

  • The American chemist Robert Hare discovered that a blow pipe flame acting upon a block of calcium oxide, which is lime, produces a brilliant white light that can be used to illuminate theater stages. We speak of someone who faces the glare of publicity as being in the “limelight”.
  • In the mid-1960’s, the motion picture director-producer Stanley Kubrick wanted from Lloyds of London an insurance policy protecting against losses should extraterrestrial intelligences be discovered before completion and release of his far-out motion picture 2001: A Space Odyssey. Lloyds declined.
  • By 1929, two years after the introduction of the “talkies”, motion pictures in the United States were attracting 100 million patrons every week.
  • Northwestern University once conferred an honorary degree on a dummy of the wooden variety. On ventriloquist Edgar Bergen’s dummy, Charlie McCarthy.
  • The English indirectly owe the preservation of Shakespeare’s birthplace to P. T. Barnum. In 1850’s, the Stratford-on-Avon cottage was neglected, and Barnum began to negotiate to acquire the house and have it shipped to his museum. The English were horrified and banded together to buy it and turned it into a national monument.

  • In the 1920’s and 1930’s, Charlie Chaplin was probably the most celebrated man in the world. During a visit to his native London, the motion picture comedian received 73,000 letters in just two days.
  • Acting was once considered so frivolous an occupation that authorities in Virginia, in 1610, forbade immigration of actors from England. Because of the evils that were thought to be associated with the craft, the cast of the first English play in colonial America in 1665 was arrested in Virginia, but later acquitted.
  • The stellar cataclysm in the motion picture 2001: A Space Odyssey was filmed by Stanley Kubrick in an abandoned corset factory in New York City. The cataclysm was a close-up shot of paint dripping in a bucket.
  • There are songs in all of Shakespeare’s plays except for Comedy of Errors. That play was the basis for a Broadway musical in 1938 that won the Pulitzer Prize: The Boys from Syracuse, by Richard Rogers and Larry Hart.
  • In 1957, Frank Sinatra was quoted as describing “rock-and-roll” as “funny and false and written and played for the most part by cretinous goons”. But when Elvis Presley finished his Army stint three or so years later, Sinatra paid him $125,000 to appear for 6 minutes on a television special.

GOTTA LOVE HOLLYWOOD . . . RIGHT?

12/11/2022 “The Young”   Leave a comment

Growing up I always wondered what I might do with my life but nothing every grabbed me and ignited a passion. It took me years of struggling and foolishness before I was able to decide the direction I wanted to take. That being said I never had an all-consuming passion from an early age for anything (except possibly for drawing) like some people have been lucky to find. I see my grandchildren now and I wonder as much as they do in what direction they may go. Through the centuries people at very young ages have done some amazing things. I thought I’d pass along a few of them today. Read these, then look at your kids and grandkids, and try and guess where they’re headed.

At the Age of 2

  • Tenzin Gyatso is declared to be the Dalai Lama.
  • Judy Garland launches her stage career.
  • Husan-t’ung becomes the final emperor of China.
  • Isabella the second ascends to the Spanish throne.

At the Age of 3

  • Tiger Woods shoots a 48 for nine holes on his hometown golf course in Cypress, California.
  • Albert Einstein speaks for the first time.
  • Ivan the Terrible becomes the Grand Prince of Moscow.
  • Alice Lindell first meets Charles Dodgson (pen name of Lewis Carroll) who was the inspiration for the book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

At the Age of 4

  • Kim Ung-Yong, with an estimated IQ of 200, speaks fluent Korean, English, Japanese, and German.
  • Andre Agassi hits tennis balls for 15 minutes with Jimmy Connors, then the world’s top player.
  • Malcolm Little – who later changes his name to Malcolm X – watches as his family’s home was burned down by members of the Ku Klux Klan.
  • Bob Hope emigrates from England to the United States.

At the Age of 5

  • Debra Wilson, mountain climber, skills a 4000-foot peak.
  • Christopher Robin Milne hears the first “Winnie the Pooh” story, with himself as the main character, made up by his father, A. A.
  • Charlie Chaplin appears with his mother on the vaudeville stage.
  • Christina becomes the Queen-elect of Sweden.

At the Age of 6

  • Shirley Temple receives an honorary Oscar for her contribution to film.
  • Marie Grosholtz – better known later as Mme. Tussaud – first works with wax.
  • Warren Buffett, peerless Wall Street investor-to-be, earns profits by selling Coca-Cola to his friends.
  • Ron Howard stars as Opie in TV’s The Andy Griffith Show.
  • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart gives keyboard concerts across Europe.
  • Clara Hirschfield, called “Tootsie” by her father, a confectioner, is honored to have his new candy, the “Tootsie Roll”, named for her.

NOW FOR ME

Age 2 – Discovered I liked milk and my first breast.

Age 3 – Discovered my hands and feet.

Age 4 – Learned my first curse word.

Age 5 – Drew my first sketch.

Age 6 – Created my first ridiculous cartoon character.

SLOW BUT STEADY PROGRESS

08/13/2022 🤩CELEBRITY ODDITIES🤩   Leave a comment

I’m not a lover of celebrities because in all cases they are as flawed and screwed up as the rest of us. Being famous just makes their activities even worse than what they actually are because the media just won’t let go of things. Here are a few celebrity facts that most of you should find interesting. As I’m told so often, “everyone loves celebrities”. Well almost everyone.

  • In 2006, William Shatner was paid $25,000.00 by an online casino for a kidney stone he had recently passed.
  • Charlie Chapin once placed third in a Charlie Chaplin look-alike contest.
  • Martha Stewart once dated actor Anthony Hopkins but dumped him because she couldn’t separate him from Hannible Lecter, his character in Silence of the Lambs.
  • Elvis Presley got a “C” in music in eight grade and was told by the teacher that he had no singing talent.
  • Actress Cybil Shepherd dated Elvis in the 70’s and hinted on the Oprah Winfrey Show that she had to teach him how to perform cunninlinqus.

  • Mickey Mouse creator Walt Disney was afraid of mice.
  • Actress Drew Barrymore began drinking at age nine, smoking weed at ten and snorting cocaine at twelve. She then entered rehab at age thirteen, the youngest star ever to do so.
  • False web rumors began to circulate in 2005 that TV star Jaleel White (Urkel on Family Matters) had committed suicide and left a note that read “Did I do that?”, Urkel’s catchphrase.
  • Nobel Prize winning biologist Francis Crick was high on LSD when he discovered the double helix structure of DNA.
  • Actress Rebecca Gayheart while on her cell phone stuck and killed a nine-year old girl in LA in 2001. She pled guilty to manslaughter and was sentenced to three years’ probation and a fine.

WE’RE LOOKING FOR VOLUNTEERS WHO WANT TO BE FAMOUS

12-02-2013 Christmas “Lives and Deaths”   Leave a comment

Since my posting yesterday I’m starting to get that a tingle of Christmas spirit once again.  With that in mind I thought I might gather a few more interesting tidbits for you concerning famous people  and their connection to Christmas Day.

December 25 is a celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ as both an important religious and historical figure. There are many others who also claim December 25th as their birthday. They’re famous and celebrated individuals who’ve filled our world with music, laughter and entertainment. Let’s take a quick look.

* * *

Rod Serling – 1924:  Creator of The Twilight Zone, Rod Serling the Emmy-award winning writer set the stage for the future of science fiction on TV.

Annie Lennox – 1954:  The angelic-voiced songstress hit it big with Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This) when she was in the musical duo “The Eurhythmics”.

Sir Isaac Newton – 1642:  Sir Isaac Newton was a true Renaissance man who made leaps and bounds in the areas of mathematics, astronomy, and physics.

Sissy Spacek –1949:  Although she has been making movies steadily, the one role which defined Sissy Spacek as an actress was portraying Loretta Lynn in 1980’s Coal Miner’s Daughter.

Clara Barton – 1821:  She was a nurse and the original Red Cross organizer.

Dido – 1971:  She is known for her hauntingly beautiful sounds that seem to transcend time.

Humphrey Bogart – 1899:  He was the rough-edged actor who help put film noir on the map. While critics and fans alike tend to put Casablanca forward as one of the best movies, To Have and Have Not is a better pick.

Jimmy Buffet: 1946:  Parrot-heads everywhere can rejoice.

Robert Ripley – 1893:  Believe It or Not, Robert Ripley was an anthropologist, although that may not be the first occupation that comes to your mind when thinking of Ripley. He premiered his Ripley’s Believe It or Not in the form of newspaper panels.

* * *

Now, I think it’s only right and proper to list those famous and infamous who’ve passed away on Christmas.  Here we go.

* * *

Dean Martin – 1995: A member of the famed Rat Pack, Dean Martin was a singer and an actor having starred in around 51 different films. He died Christmas morning in his home of respiratory failure brought on perhaps by his lung cancer and emphysema.

Billy Martin – 1989: He was best known for his role as the manager of the New York Yankees. He started his baseball career as a second baseman and then became the manager known for arguing with the umpires and doing a special kicking move throwing dirt at them. Martin died in a car accident in New York on Christmas day.

James Brown – 2006: The godfather of soul and funk died from pneumonia on Christmas day in Atlanta Georgia.  He was 73 years old when he passed.

Richard Paul – 1998: Another actor who died during the yuletide season in 1998 was actor Richard Paul. He was Mr. Strowbridge on the show Full House as well as the mayor on Murder, She Wrote.  He died of cancer.

WC Fields – 1946: He was an actor and a film writer, known for his comedic timing. Supposedly after he was checked in to a hospital, feeling ill, a friend caught him reading the Bible and quotes Fields as having said he was “checking for loopholes.” He died in a sanatorium in Pasadena, California after having been hospitalized for around fourteen months. He perished from a stomach hemorrhage. He was 66 years old.

Denver Pyle – 1997: This actor who died of lung cancer was first known as Mad Jack on the show The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams, and then went on to become famous as Uncle Jesse in the show The Dukes of Hazzard.

Charlie Chaplin -1977: Famous as the Little Tramp, Chaplin is an acting icon immediately recognizable by most every generation. Hailed for his comedic performances, he was also an Oscar winner before his Christmas death. He died in Vevey, Switzerland at the age of 88.

And a few others:

Reggie White – famous football player for the Green Bay Packers.

Gerald Ford – Was once the President of the United States of America.

Nigel Hawthorne – An actor who was in the film Amistad as well as did some voice over for the Disney cartoon: Tarzan.

Jason Robards – The actor who played a congressman in Enemy of the State with Will Smith, as well as the dying Earl Partridge in Magnolia starring Tom Cruise.

Curtis Mayfield – A singer/songwriter known fro bringing the soul and funk to R & B music.

Dian FosseGorillas In The Mist was about her and she was later murdered in Rwanda.

Jack Benny – A comedian, actor, and all around performer, who died in 1974.

* * *

It must be quite a life when you’re a celebrity.  You’re born on Christmas Day which is celebrated by everyone every year and then you become rich and famous because of your many talents and are celebrated yet again. Unfortunately some of them die on Christmas and are then remembered forever on stupid blogs like this.  As they say “Any publicity is good publicity.”

HO! HO! HO!

05-20-2013   4 comments

I started out today writing a post on political polling.  Upon completion I reread it and found myself bored to actual tears.  I may post it in the future but every time I write about politics or politicians I feel kinda dirty.  Someday soon when I’m having one of those “I hate politicians” days I’ll post it. Today I feel like passing along a few more items of totally useless information to help make your lives richer and fuller.  Here we go.

  • Too much coffee can kill you. A lethal dose for an average adult is around 10 grams. That’s the equivalent of drinking between fifty and two hundred cups in rapid succession.
  • Malaria mosquitos are attracted to ripe Limburger cheese and smelly feet.
  • Members of the U.S. Congress are the highest paid legislators in the world.
  • Toilet paper was invented by the Chinese. In 1391 they produced 720,000 sheets a year for exclusive use of the emperor. Each sheet measured 2 feet by three feet.
  • Disney World in  Orlando covers 30,400 acres or 46 square miles.  That’s twice the size of Manhattan.
  • A cockroaches brain is spread throughout it’s body., If you chop off the head, it can still live up to a week. It finally dies because it can’t eat.
  • You can get cooties. Cooties are lice.
  • Mosquito repellant does not repel mosquitos. It blocks their sensors so they don’t know your there.
  • Poison ivy is a member of the cashew family of plants that supplies us with cashews and pistachio nuts.
  • Charlie Chaplin once lost a Charlie Chaplin look-alike contest.  He didn’t even make it to the finals.
  • Artists have more sexual partners.
  • The Puritan’s bought beer to America.
  • Antarctica is the only continent without owls.
  • A ten gallon hat only holds three-quarters  of a gallon.
  • The first film version of Frankenstein was a fifteen minute silent produced by Thomas Edison.

Well there you have it.  I saved you all from a boring political rant and offered up this collection of incredible information at the same time.  We do live in miraculous times, don’t we? I’m out the door and on my way in five minutes so ending this right now is necessary. Consider it ended.

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