Archive for the ‘history’ Tag

08/27/2021 Old Golden Rule Days   Leave a comment

As most of you are aware I am a lover of all things trivial and historical. I love all history but especially my own. Now it’s time for me to take you on a little trip down memory lane back to 1960. I’m going to introduce you to someone in my life who left me with vivid memories of school and a few emotional and geographical scars.

The lady in question was my eighth grade geography teacher. She was obsessed with geography to a fault. She was one of the meanest teachers I’ve ever had but also absolutely unforgettable (and not in a good way). On the first day of classes she told our group that half of our grade for the entire year would be based on our ability to memorize all the countries of the United Nations in alphabetical order and to recite it in front of the class. We spent many a day standing in front of the classroom and reciting as best we could as many of the countries as possible. Did I learn the countries, you bet I did, and at that time there were 82 of them.

All of us students agreed that she was an absolute lunatic and that was never disproven. She passed away many years ago and I actually sat in a bar that night with a close friend, another of her students, and toasted the old girl with a few stiff drinks. I didn’t attend her funeral but I was tempted to because I wanted to make sure she was really gone. This post is a something of a memorial and tribute to miss Mabel Milldollar, one of the most unforgettable persons I’ve ever met. This list of trivia items would have been something she would have loved but only if she could have used the information to create one of her memorable pop quizzes. They were brutal. Let’s get this started….

  • The part of the United States that the sun shines on first is the top of Mount Cadillac in Maine.
  • The state of Hawaii is composed of 132 Islands.
  • 25% of the State of California is made up of deserts.
  • The southernmost tip of Africa is the Cape of Agulhas.
  • The northernmost point in the United States is the city of Point Barrow, Alaska.
  • The city of Timbuktu is located in Mali in Western Africa.
  • The Sahara desert in North Africa has an area of 3,250,000 square miles.
  • Western South Dakota marks the geographical center of the United States since the addition of Hawaii and Alaska.
  • Piccadilly Circus in London got its name from collars, called picadillo’s, that were made by a tailor name Robert Baker who created them in the area.
  • The highest uninterrupted waterfall in the world is Angel Falls in Venezuela. It has a 3212 foot drop.
  • The lowest point of dry land on the earth is the shore of the Dead Sea, between Jordan and Israel, which is approximately 1300 feet below sea level.

I hope you’re smiling up at me Miss Milldollar because you couldn’t possibly be looking down on me. Your evil brainwashing techniques would have certainly qualified you for special duty at Club Gitmo. No terrorist in the world could have stood up to that “evil eye” you were famous for. I hope you’re sitting in the corner of wherever you happen to be with a pointy dunce cap on your head and having your hand smacked with a big ass ruler.

Am I bitter? Nah, I’m not bitter.

08/16/2021  Ten Year Anniversary   Leave a comment

Good morning readers. I just wanted to let everyone know I’m within two weeks of celebrating my tenth year of blogging which I think requires me to do an honest review of myself. I have to admit it’s been a real learning experience but one I wouldn’t change for anything. I never decided to blog because I thought I had all the answers or that my philosophy of life was of any interest to anyone but me. I blog primarily to keep myself sane. Blogging is a good way for me to vent and lower my blood pressure all at the same time.  I especially enjoy reading the feedback even if it’s discourteous, rude, or off-color.  It’s called freedom of speech.

I initially blogged about personal stories of my life but found out very quickly that family and friends dislike notoriety. From that point on I made sure to never mention names or to post any family members photographs.

I then moved into politics and voiced my opinions rather loudly and pointedly. It helped me to quickly discover that most blog surfers are of the “sound bite” generations. My goal then became writing a variety of articles that would keep readers reading to the end. It involved a mix of politics, humor, sarcasm, trivia, and whatever else I could find. I’m interested in anyone who really wants to take the time to read every word, think about it for a while, and then comment with a yea or nay. I’m not looking for approval just honest and open discussions and opinions.

After my interest in political blogging waned I decided to return to writing about personal stories from my past. It seemed the best way to go if I wanted to increased traffic. It also seemed that I wasn’t the only person fed up with politics and politicians. I love embracing change and have done so many times over the years. An old quote I heard many years ago still holds true today: “the greatest opportunities are found on the edge of chaos”.

I have a rather loyal following of readers who’ve stayed with me through my cancer diagnosis, surgeries, and a year of little or no blog postings. I’d like to thank them all for their continuing interest and support. It made returning to this blog a much easier transition than I had ever hoped for. Thanks again.

 

05-02-2016 Journal–Presidential Trivia!   Leave a comment

thY0MYAR1P

As I prepare for the exit of Barack Obama as President my mind naturally turns to politics. I’m not going to get into the expected arguments concerning the current roster of candidates because it’s pointless. People make up their own minds and then spend all of their leisure time trying to convince everyone else to vote like they do because they’re smarter than everyone else.  It’s those kinds of discussions I don’t want taking place on this blog.

I honestly don’t care a wit for who any of you may vote for.  Just like I won’t tell you what I’m going to do. If I agree with your selection I’m smart and intelligent and if I don’t then I’m a dumb ass without a clue about politics. It’s a lose . . . lose for me and not worth my time.

th53YLV3MC

As much as I dislike politics and politicians I still love trivia.  So I’ll delve into my archives to find a few interesting political tidbits from past Presidents and presidencies.  Here they are.

* * *

Herbert Hoover was the only president to turn over 40 years of his government paychecks to charity.

A $5.7 million dollar renovation of the White House during the Truman administration was caused when the leg of Margaret Truman’s piano broke through the floor of v\her sitting room into the room below.

President Lyndon Johnson and his wife named their dogs Him & Her. Franklin D. Roosevelt and his wife named their pistols His & Hers.

Camp David located in the Catoctin Mountains was originally named Shangri- La before renaming by FDR.

James Madison, the fourth President was 5’4” tall and never weighed more than 100 pounds.

George Washington’s second inaugural address was the shortest in history.  It contained only 135 words.

William Howard Taft had a bathtub installed in the White House large enough to hold four men.  He weighed in at the time at 325 pounds.

thRNVU29M5

During his 12 years as President FDR used his veto powers 635 times.

Alexander Hamilton is credited with writing George Washington’s famous Farewell Address.

The average age that Presidents have taken office is 54.

First Lady Barbara Bush’s great-great-great uncle was President Franklin Pierce.

FDR was the only President who never used the word “I” in his inaugural speech.

The nickname of the first Presidential plane (a C-45 piloted by Major Henry T. Myers in 1944) was the, ”Sacred Cow”.

John Tyler was the only President to serve as a member of of the Congress of the Confederate States.

John Quincy Adams was the first President to wear long pants rather than knee breeches to his inauguration in 1825.

* * *

thSJ0QLP46

I think that’s about enough politics for me today.  Anymore and I’ll become nauseous and violently ill.

03-01-2016 Journal–Looking Back–March 1st!   Leave a comment

thUQBQBQSV

Being a history buff has been a lifelong pleasure for me.  I’ve always believed that individuals and governments have much to learn from their past mistakes and by studying those mistakes can improve their future circumstances. With that in mind I thought I’d step back in time to review and pass on to all of you a few interesting factoids  on notable occurrences for March 1.

Some of you may find these items interesting and others not so much.  My better-half will more often than not just roll her eyes and then turn up the volume of the music she’s listening to when I start spouting historical facts.   I guess I can’t please everyone all of the time but I’ll keep trying.  Here we go.

This Day In History – March 1st

1954 U.S.A. – US tests hydrogen bomb in the Pacific archipelago of Bikini, part of the Marshall Islands. 

1961 U.S.A. – President John F. Kennedy establishes the Peace Corps as a new agency within the Department of State.

1932 U.S.A. – The Lindbergh baby is kidnapped when stolen from his crib at the family estate in Hopewell, New Jersey, 

1936 U.S.A. – The Hoover Dam ( Boulder Dam ) is completed and turned over to the U.S. government. It supplies hydroelectricity, irrigation and fresh water to homes in California and Nevada. 

1941 U.S.A. – Nashville, Tennessee becomes the home of the very first FM radio station in the country. While the FM band had less static and more range, it didn’t become popular until the early 1960s.

1954 U.S.A. – Five U.S. congressmen were shot and injured during a House session today when Puerto Rican spectators who yelled "Free Puerto Rico" fired shots into the United States Capitol building.

1962 U.S.A. – On this day, 95 people were killed in a plane crash that occurred along the South shore of Long Island, New York. The irony of it all is that this plane crash happened after the end of a long stretch of bad weather (rain and fog) that had continued for about a week-on a clear day. 

1966 Soviet Union – An unmanned Soviet probe called Venera 3 crashes on Venus in the pursuit of the conquest of space.

th3DYQ57DX

1971 U.S.A. – The radical left organization Weather Underground  bombs the United States Capitol on March 1, 1971. A bomb was placed in the senate wing causing $300,000 damage and no injuries. 

1972 Syria -  This was one of the significant days of the attack by Israel against the Arabs. The Israeli army launched attacks against Arab Guerrilla camps that operated in southern Syria at this time. Fighting back and forth continued on at different times after this until the present day. 

1973 Sudan – The Palestinian terrorist group Black September storm the Saudi Arabian embassy in the Sudanese capital Khartoum, taking diplomats hostage. ( This was the same terrorist organization that murdered nine Israeli athletes at the Munich Olympics). 

thXFUDFYL0

1978 Switzerland -  The coffin of Charlie Chaplin was stolen from a small, unguarded village cemetery in Switzerland . 

1997 U.S.A. – Massive flooding occurred throughout the state of Kentucky with thousands left homeless and more than 50 people dead. 

2002 U.S.A – The possibility of water still existing on Mars was made known. According to NASA, a spacecraft called Odyssey had detected it on this planet.

2005 U.S.A. – Dennis Rader, accused of leading a double life as the BTK ( Bind, Torture and Kill, ) serial killer, was charged in Wichita, Kan., with 10 counts of first-degree murder between 1974 and 1991.. (Rader later pleaded guilty and received multiple life sentences.) 

thB3YSUWWZ

2007 U.S.A. – A series of 55 Tornadoes strike the southern United States that began in Kansas on February 28th, 2007 and included Alabama and Georgia, the tornadoes leave 20 dead with the worst effected area being Enterprise, Alabama where a section of the Enterprise High School was destroyed during the middle of the school day killing 8 and injuring many more. 

2008 Afghanistan -  Prince Harry who was sent secretly to Afghanistan with his regiment in December at his request  is forced to return to Britain following the American website, The Drudge Report, making his deployment public. 

2008 United States – People have been watching the naming of the warship that was built from parts of the steel salvaged from the World Trade Center. The families of the 9/11 victims were among the thousands of spectators at the naming of the U.S.S. New York, in Avondale, Louisiana. The bow contains 7.5 tons of steel taken from Ground Zero. It bears a shield with two bars to symbolize the towers, and a banner with the slogan “Never Forget”. The New York is an amphibious landing ship with a crew of 360, and complement of 700 marines. 

th1HKA79JO

‘Never Forget’

2012 United States – Thursday, 1st March, 2012 : The suspected gunman, TJ Lane, in a deadly school shooting will face charges as a juvenile in the US state of Ohio. Lane was suspected of killing three students and wounding two at Chardon High School.

There’s your history lesson for today. Whoever said that March was a slow winter month was badly mistaken. Just ask Julius Caesar.

02-18-2016 Journal – Me and Julius Caesar!   Leave a comment

th8XKG92J2
It’s 630am and I just finished watching Julius Caesar be murdered for the umpteenth time. What a bizarre way to start my day.  I’m badly addicted to the late great HBO series, Rome, and watching it has slowly become my morning ritual. My fixation with all things Roman began in my junior year of high school with the reading of Julius Caesar and my three years of Latin language  classes also helped. Later in college I became quite fond of wearing togas giving me a whole new appreciation for Roman ingenuity when it came to easy-removed clothing.

thW80B849W
Over the years I’ve read almost everything I could find about that time period trying in vain to understand how such an advanced society could become so bloodthirsty and uncaring about human life.  The history of the time gave me a great deal of respect for Spartacus and his minions who rose up and attempted to free themselves from slavery even though they were all killed in the process.  I remain puzzled by the entire era which forces me to keep reading about it.

I’ve heard so many people over the years comparing the situation in this country to Rome’s decline and in some ways agreed with them. The only accurate comparison for me concerned the continuing lack of morality in Rome that seemed to increase year by year with their affluence. The United States seems to me to be in a similar rut but comparing the two in their entirety is like comparing apples with oranges.

th36QD46EE
I’ve been reading for the last few months a book written in the mid-1700’s by Edward Gibbons, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. It’s a difficult read on a good day as are all books written by so-called intellectuals.  There are as many footnotes as actual text in the book and I wanted to scream out loud before I made it through the first 100 pages. It became somewhat easier when I decided to completely disregard all of the footnotes and just read the actual text. I’ll probably finish reading this cumbersome tome in a few months but it won’t be easy.  Unfortunately there’s just enough valuable information in it to keep me reading to the end.

thPF37CZY8
I just finished my second cup of hot black coffee and I can feel my energy level beginning to rise. I’ll be spending some time today putting the finishing touches to a print I’ve been working on.  It’s an abstraction of a family photo
taken last Christmas in front of the tree. It’s more of an experiment in the use of vivid colors while working with materials that are somewhat new to me.  It’s preparing me for a more detailed and difficult project that I’ll be starting in the next few weeks using these same materials. As always practice and preparation make for a satisfactory completion of any project.

I’ll watch a few more minutes of Rome then get up to face my day.  I should be safe since the Ides of March are still a few weeks away.

03-17-2015 Journal–Spring is Now Officially Here!   Leave a comment

More light snow through the night last night but we’re expecting warmer temperatures today.  As we drove through the surrounding towns this morning it became fairly obvious that Spring has officially sprung.  It seems as if every maple tree in Maine is in the process of being tapped for their sap.  It’s one of the best indicators that Winter is on it’s way out finally.  These first two photos are examples of the old time way of tapping.

DSC_0007B

‘Old School – Low Tech’

DSC_0010B

Many of the local farming families have been doing this since just after the Pilgrims landed and like doing it the tried and true way of their predecessors.  Others have succumbed to the more modern ways and now use multiple plastic tubes from multiple trees that flow into a central container.  Take a look.

DSC_0012B

‘New School – High Tech’

DSC_0016B

The results are the same but there’s something really comforting about seeing it done the old way.  You can almost picture the pilgrims and their ancestors tapping trees in these same areas in the mid 1600’s.  History is just too cool.

As we made our way home I snapped this final picture of what looks to be a very lonely horse.  He’s just hanging around and watching the world go by. I think he’ll be just as happy as the rest of us to see Spring arrive.

DSC_0048B

01-23-2014 – The Price of Love and Sex!   3 comments

I thought today I would address an issue that seems to have become an accepted illegal activity in parts of our society and other societies in the world. You see it almost every day on TV, in many  movies, and in everyday life if you travel to Nevada and Las Vegas. It was also responsible for kick-starting the career of one of America’s most famous actresses, Julia Roberts. It’s known as the world’s oldest profession and I suppose I’d have to agree with that because I can’t prove otherwise.  It’s just an excepted fact that almost anywhere at any time in history when you get more than a few human beings living together it’s quite possible one of them will be or will become a prostitute.

I’m about to lay a gang of statistics on you about prostitution in the United States and around the world. The numbers listed are estimated figures collected from open source documents published by security agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and media reports. Thank you so much Internet.

Say what you will, prostitution is big business. The worldwide prostitution revenues are estimated to be $186 billion per year and the number of prostitutes working worldwide is estimated to be near 13,265,900.

How many times in recent memory while watching a Olympic sporting event have you heard the chant, “We’re #1, We’re #1” or U S A, U S A.  It may be true in sports but it certainly isn’t true in prostitution. Here are the top ten countries by number of estimated prostitutes.  As in many things these days, China is leading the pack.

Number of Prostitutes

1.  China  5,000,000
2.  India  3,000,000
3.  Russia  1,600,000
4.  United States  1,000,000
5.  Philippines  800,000
6.  Mexico  500,000
7.  Germany  400,000
8.  Thailand  250,000
9.   Brazil  250,000 children
10. Bangladesh 200,000

And then there’s poor Ireland:

29. Ireland 1,000

It just goes to prove that the United States is losing market share in everything including the sale of sex. Now I’ll list for you the estimated prices for prostitution services in these great United States of ours. I’ve listed poor Bangladesh only because as far as I can determine from the statistics I reviewed that it’s the cheapest place in the world to get laid.

United States Prostitution Price Sheet

$50 to $100 for street prostitute (National Averages)
High-End Escort in Indianapolis: $500 per hour
High-End Escort in NYC: $10,000 a night
Legal Brothel in Nevada: $200 to $600
Massage Parlor: $200 to $400 for oral sex and intercourse
Massage Parlor Worker Earnings: $8,000 to $10,000
Minnesota: $60 for oral sex with minor
Pennsylvania Earnings: $2,000 a week
Portland, OR: $130
Prison Guards: $150 charged by female guards
Santa Ana, CA: Under $100 per act
Silicon Valley: $350 to $500 per hour
Underage Girls: $40 to $100 for 15 to 30 minutes of sex
Washington, DC: $200 an hour

And once again poor little Bangladesh bringing up the rear (no pun intended).

Bangladesh: $0.60

My next statistic  includes the top 10 countries in the world by the estimated revenues collected by their prostitutes. It’s no big surprise the Chinese are again the world leader. The United States has dropped to fifth-place in this category behind our former WW II enemies, Germany and Japan. I’m not sure whether that’s relevant but I’m putting it out there.

Revenues in U.S. Dollars

China   $73 Billion
Spain   $26.5 Billion
Japan   $24 Billion
Germany   $18 Billion (Legal Industry)
United States   $14.6 Billion
South Korea   $12 Billion
India   $8.4 Billion
Thailand   $6.4 Billion
Philippines   $6 Billion
Switzerland   $4.4 Billion (Legal Industry)

You regular readers of this blog know I’ve spent many hours compiling lists of totally useless information for your review. Today I’ll be supplying you with totally useless information but only about prostitution and prostitutes. Some of these facts are interesting and some are not but here they are anyway.

  • 70% of female inmates in American prisons were initially arrested for prostitution.
  • Over 1 million people in the US have worked as prostitutes.
  • 77.8% of prostitution arrests are women, 22.2% men.
  • 85-90% of those arrested are street prostitutes, who account for only 20% of prostitutes
  • Only 3-5% of STDs are prostitution-related.
  • 80% of prostitutes have been sexually assaulted, some raped as many as 8-10 time annually.
  • 59% of prostitutes have thought of committing suicide, compared to 61% of non-prostitutes.
  • In a study in London, England 50% of clients were married, or cohabiting.
    Male prostitutes sometimes report that their clients include married men who identify as heterosexual.
  • Street prostitution accounts for between 10 to 20% of the prostitution in larger cities such as Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York.
  • The average age of entry into prostitution is 13 years of age.
  • 52% of the women stated that pornography played a significant role in teaching them what was expected of them as prostitutes.
  • A Canadian Report on Prostitution and Pornography concluded that girls and women in prostitution have a mortality rate 40 times higher than the national average.

I suppose you’ve noticed by now that I’ve not mentioned any of my own personal involvement with prostitutes or prostitution. While it’s really no one’s business but my own, I’m not the least bit embarrassed to admit I’ve on occasion paid my own way. It was many years ago in a faraway land and it was a “Right of Passage” for some of us servicemen. Of course after looking at today’s prices I’d be forced to travel to Bangladesh to be able to afford it. Don’t forget, I’m on a fixed retirement income and I’m forced to watch every penny but even I could afford $ .60.

12-01-2013 Useless Christmas Factoids   Leave a comment

DSC_6013

Here’s Our Tree!

The end of November signals the start of all the normal Christmas insanity that most of us complain about.  Shopping, crowds, traffic jams, annoying music, and people everywhere with their hands extended looking for money.  It makes me happy not to be a religious person because if I were, I’d be really pissed off and upset.  The Christmas tradition in this country has slowly morphed into a typical American greed-fest.  I thought today I’d forward along a list of thirty factoids about the holiday from a few countries around the globe and many from the United States.  Some are crazy and others just a little bit interesting.  Enjoy them and hopefully they’ll spark some of that good old Christmas spirit from when you were a kid.  I threw that photo of our tree in just to let you know I am participating regardless of how much I complain.

  • Puritan Oliver Cromwell outlawed Christmas celebrations and carols in England from 1649-1660. The only celebrations allowed were sermons and prayers.
  • The people at Reynolds (aluminum foil) make a substantial amount of money selling foil during the Yuletide season. It has been confirmed that at least 3000 tons of foil are used to wrap turkeys annually.
  • Warning: Christmas shopping may be hazardous to your health. If you are an avid Christmas shopper statistics have concluded that you will be elbowed at least three times while shopping. Ouch!
  • Sending Christmas cards is still the in thing to do around Christmas time. Americans on average send out 28 Christmas cards to friends and family yearly, and guess what, it’s certainly not in vain either, most will receive 28 for the same period.
  • Christmas is a great time to exercise. You will walk an average of five miles between the parking lot and stores, however, don’t let this give you a false sense of security, most people still gain those pesky Christmas pounds despite this.
  • Bolivians celebrate Misa del Gallo or “Mass of the Rooster” on Christmas Eve. Some people bring roosters to the midnight mass, a gesture that symbolizes the belief that a rooster was the first animal to announce the birth of Jesus.
  • In Poland, spiders or spider webs are common Christmas trees decorations because according to legend, a spider wove a blanket for Baby Jesus.
  • Alabama was the first state in the United States to officially recognize Christmas in 1836. Oklahoma was the last state the declare Christmas a holiday.
  • The Germans made the first artificial Christmas trees out of dyed goose feathers.
  • Each year more than 3 billion Christmas cards are sent in the U.S. alone.

  • All the gifts in the Twelve Days of Christmas would equal 364 gifts.
  • In A.D. 350, Pope Julius I, bishop of Rome, proclaimed December 25 the official celebration date for the birthday of Christ.
  • According to the Guinness world records, the tallest Christmas tree ever cut was a 221-foot Douglas fir that was displayed in 1950 at the Northgate Shopping Center in Seattle, Washington.
  • The traditional three colors of Christmas are green, red, and gold. Green has long been a symbol of life and rebirth; red symbolizes the blood of Christ, and gold represents light as well as wealth and royalty.
  • According to data analyzed from Facebook posts, two weeks before Christmas is one of the two most popular times for couples to break up. However, Christmas Day is the least favorite day for breakups.
  • Contrary to popular belief, suicide rates during the Christmas holiday are low.
  • The world’s largest Christmas stocking measured 106 feet and 9 inches long and 49 feet and 1 inches wide. It weighed as much as five reindeer and held almost 1,000 presents. It was made by the Children’s Society in London on December 14, 2007.
  • Christmas trees usually grow for about 15 years before they are sold.
  • President Teddy Roosevelt, an environmentalist, banned Christmas trees from the White House in 1912.
  • Each year there are approximately 20,000 “rent-a-Santa’s” across the United States. “Rent-a-Santa’s” usually undergo seasonal training on how to maintain a jolly attitude under pressure from the public.

  • Christmas wasn’t declared an official holiday in the United States until June 26, 1870.
  • Oklahoma was the last U.S. state to declare Christmas a legal holiday, in 1907.
  • In 1962, the first Christmas postage stamp was issued in the United States.
  • Christmas purchases account for 1/6 of all retail sales in the U.S.
  • Because they viewed Christmas as a decadent Catholic holiday, the Puritans in America banned all Christmas celebrations from 1659-1681 with a penalty of five shillings for each offense.
  • Because of their pagan associations, both the holly (associated with the masculine principle) and the ivy (the feminine) and other green boughs in home decoration were banned by the sixth-century Christian Council of Braga.
  • There are two competing claims as to which president was the first to place a Christmas tree in the White House. Some scholars say President Franklin Pierce did in 1856; others say President Benjamin Harrison brought in the first tree in 1889. President Coolidge started the White House lighting ceremony in 1923.
  • There are approximately 21,000 Christmas tree farms in the United States.
  • The first printed reference to a Christmas tree was in 1531 in Germany.
  • Approximately 30-35 million real (living) Christmas trees are sold each year in the U.S.

ENJOY THE SEASON

11-20-2013 Learning From the Past   5 comments

As a young man I was known for never listening to figures of authority up to and including my parents.  Now that I’m older and somewhat wiser I realize that was a mistake.  I guess hind sight is always 20/20 as they say.  In my younger days I ignored everyone’s advice and paid a heavy price for my youthful arrogance. The adage  “Live and learn” is no joke.

It’s still our responsibility as reasonable adults and voting citizens to pass what we know along to our kids and even our politicians.  At some point the young people will become older and wiser and may have an interest in the things we say if we’ve been previously proven correct.  Most of the politicians these days show their arrogance by failing to  listen to their constituency and will pay the price for that arrogance by being voted out of office. We can’t make anyone listen but we do have the responsibility as voters to make the information available to them regardless. So peruse these quotations and glean whatever information you can from them.  I only wish our representatives could put their ego’s on the back-burner for a change and admit that they could learn a little something from their predecessors.

* * *

“We the people are the rightful masters of both Congress and the courts, not to overthrow the Constitution but to overthrow the men who pervert the Constitution.”  Abraham Lincoln

“A friend is one who has the same enemies as you have.”  Martin Luther King Jr.

“In the End, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.”   Albert Einstein

“Those who are too smart to engage in politics are punished by being governed by those who are dumber.”   Plato

“Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I’m not sure about the universe.”   Albert Einstein

“Those who say religion has nothing to do with politics do not know what religion is.”    Mahatma Gandhi

“Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth.”  Albert Einstein

LIVE AND LEARN

11-15-2013 Students, Teachers and Followers   Leave a comment

As  I’ve mentioned previously my better-half’s daughter is a Math teacher in one of our local Middle Schools.  I love listening to  her war stories when we get together because I envy her at times.  Nothing is more important than education and the interaction with the students is what I consider a major perk.  Unfortunately some students take a little longer to get their act together as you will see in the following short essays. All errors in spelling and grammar remain as they were written.  They will make you smile.

  • The inhabitants of ancient Egypt were called mummies. They lived in the Sarah Dessert and traveled by Camelot. The climate of the Sarah is such that the inhabitants have to live elsewhere, so certain areas of the dessert are cultivated by irritation. The Egyptians built the Pyramids in the shape of a huge triangular cube. The Pyramids are a range of mountains between France and Spain.
  • The Bible is full of interesting caricatures. In the first book of the Bible, Guinnesss, Adam and Eve were created from an apple tree. One of their children, Cain, once asked, "Am I my brother’s son?" God asked Abraham to sacrifice Isaac on Mount Montezuma. Jacob, son of Isaac, stole his brother’s birth mark. Jacob was a patriarch who brought up his twelve sons to be patriarchs, but they did not take to it. One of Jacob’s sons, Joseph, gave refuse to the Israelites.
  • Pharaoh forced the Hebrew slaves to make bread without straw. Moses led them to the Red Sea, where they made unleavened bread, which is bread made without any ingredients. Afterwards, Moses went up on Mount Cyanide to get the Ten Commandments. David was a Hebrew king skilled at playing the liar. He fought with the Philatelists, a race of people who lived in Biblical times. Solomon, one of David’s sons, had 500 wives and 500 porcupines.
  • Without the Greeks we wouldn’t have history. The Greeks invented three kinds of columns – Corinthian, Doric, and Ironic. They also had myths. A myth is a female moth. One myth says that the mother of Achilles dipped him in the River Stynx until he became intollerable. Achilles appears in The Iliad, by Homer. Homer also wrote The Oddity, in which Penelope was the last hardship that Ulysses endured on his journey. Actually, Homer was not written by Homer but by another man of that name.
  • Socrates was a famous Greek teacher who went around giving people advice. They killed him. Socrates died from an overdose of wedlock.
  • In the Olympic Games, Greeks ran races, jumped, hurled the biscuits, and threw the java. The reward to the victor was a coral wreath. The government of Athens was democratic because people took the law into their own hands. There were no wars in Greece, as the mountains were so high that they couldn’t climb over to see what their neighbors were doing. When they fought with the Persians, the Greeks were outnumbered because the Persians had more men.

They made me laugh a little and took me to a whole new level of respect for teachers.  Molding these youngsters into intelligent and thoughtful human beings is quite the challenge and I’m just glad there are people out there who’ve been called to the teaching profession.  Just amazing.

And last but not least I’d like to acknowledge and thank my newest followers.  I encourage you to visit their sites and to enjoy their efforts as I do.  Thanks again.

  frainkey

 likedandsharedthis

 solberg73

 kayleighmahon

 Tanner Hawryluk

 jamesneed

 bettersexadvice

%d bloggers like this: